December 2019 Quote of the Month

A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it is but a prologue to a farce or a tragedy, or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.” -James Madison

November 2019 Quote of the Month

“They were careless people[…]- they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness […], and let other people clean up the mess they had made.

– Nick Carraway, The Great Gatsby by Scott Fitzgerald

August 2019 Quote of the Month

By believing passionately in something that still does not exist, we create it. The nonexistent is whatever we have not sufficiently desired.

-Kafka

[Repost] More on “Redefining Incivility”

Some time ago, we documented how reactionaries have a habit of redefining incivility (and civility) to suit their purposes, making huge shifts of the goalposts as it suits their needs. In recent days, there have been two well-publicized incidents that have made this tendency painfully apparent: the Red Hen affair, and the Maryland newsroom shooting. […]

via More on “Redefining Incivility” — The Propaganda Professor

[A Reblog] Psychology on Beating a Dead Horse

Another name to something that was previously just an observed behavior! In this case, the tendency of people to not give up even after it has been shown that further effort will not change the outcome. The continued effort might even be detrimental to yourself in some significant way too which makes this behavior all the more baffling and illogical. Well, the name for it is the sunk cost effect and here’s the article on it and an excerpt:

https://thelastbehaviorist.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-sunk-cost-effect.html

“Ah, the Concorde; the joint development program of the British and French governments that pushed ahead even when the economic benefits of the project were no longer possible. It was designed to be a passenger aircraft capable of supersonic flight but its lasting legacy resides mostly in game theory, where it has been adopted as a description of irrational behavior – the Concorde fallacy. More generally, the process behind the fallacy is known as the sunk cost effect.”

Featured Image also from the same article

August 2017 Quote of the Month

 Ideals too easily give way to dogma. Dogma becomes fanaticism. No higher power sits in judgement of us. No supreme being watches to punish us for our sins. In the end, only we ourselves can guard against our obsessions.  -Arno Victor Dorian

April 2017 Quote of the Month

“I think that most of us, anyway, read these stories that we know are not “true” because we’re hungry for another kind of truth: the mythic truth about human nature in general, the particular truth about those life-communities that define our own identity, and the most specific truth of all: our own self-story. Fiction, because it is not about someone who lived in the real world, always has the possibility of being about oneself.”

-Ender’s Game, Orson Scott Card

Continue reading April 2017 Quote of the Month

March 2017 Quote of the Month

 

“When something impossible happens, there are only two possibilities. Either your assumptions are wrong, or you have gone crazy.” -Shinya Kougami